Cut Golf Cut DC Golf Ball Review

Cut Golf Cut DC Golf Ball Review

The premium golf ball market is a tough place to make a splash for a newcomer. Titliest has been the dominant force in this space for decades, and companies such as Bridgestone, Srixon, TaylorMade and Callaway all have strong followings and significant Tour presence when it comes to their golf balls. But that hasn’t stopped new companies from entering the fray in recent years, some of which have found success.

Among this group would be brands like Vice, Snell, Kirkland and Maxfli, all of which offer tour-caliber golf balls, many of which are more competitively priced than the most popular balls in the game. You can also add Cut Golf to this list. The California-based company was founded in 2016 with the primary goal of giving golfers a better combination of performance and value than the other options they had to choose from.

Cut golf balls range in price from just under $10 per dozen to just under $30 per dozen for the brand’s most technologically advanced golf ball, the Cut DC, which is a golf ball four-piece urethane coated. The DC stands for Dual Core technology, a design approach that incorporates a softer inner core and a firmer outer core to create optimal performance both in the long game and around the greens. I recently had the chance to test the Cut DC and performance wise it impressed.

Cut Golf Cut Golf Ball DC

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

The tests I performed with the Cut DC took place at the Atlanta National Golf Club. I first tested the DC against the Maxfli Tour X, both in the short game zone and on the golf course for comparisons related to feel, spin, distance and durability. I chose the Tour X because it’s another four-piece urethane golf ball that would fall into the value category for a ball of this design. I also tested it earlier this spring and came away very impressed. And then finally I played a few rounds of 18 holes with the Cut DC to see how it was trying to put a score together.

In my first tests in the short game zone when hitting short yards and chip shots, as well as corner shots from around 70 yards and up, the Cut DC performed at a high level. In fact, it exceeded all expectations in spin and greenside control and clearly outperformed the Maxfli in that regard. It also provided a nice, smooth feel when playing shots around the green and when putting.

As I moved my comparison testing to the golf course, I expected the DC Cut to potentially struggle against the Tour X, which in my previous tests turned out to be outstanding in terms of long-term distance and performance. This was not the case, however. The DC consistently tracked the Maxfli off the tee and I found both balls to be similar on approach shots as well.

Cut Golf Cut Golf Ball DC

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

The biggest difference I found in the long game between the two balls was that the Cut DC produced a much higher pilot trajectory. I would also say that between the two, the DC felt slightly softer on the face when hitting full iron shots, while the Maxfli produced more of a click. The feel and sound of the driver was very similar.

The initial performance I saw of the DC Cut left me looking forward to playing the golf ball in real games. One thing I was looking forward to seeing was the kind of maneuverability the ball provided, as the company claims maneuverability is one of the DC’s strongest attributes.

On the golf course, the performance was again at the rendezvous. I continued to see a higher trajectory from the pilot, but the ball flight was steady in the wind. I also found I was able to work the ball well with the DC, especially with the irons, both in terms of shot form and trajectory. And the stopping power on approach shots into the greens was impressive, even from raw lies.

Cut DC Golf Ball Cover Comparison

The DC Cut had some issues with cover durability. On the left is a brand new ball while on the right is an example of some wear/scuffs after playing 18 holes.

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

It wasn’t all peaches and cream, however, as the Cut DC had some issues with cover durability, which I was concerned about after the first tests I ran against the Maxfli, which is a much more durable golf ball. The most problematic with the DC was full corner shots. They created significant scratches, to the point that there were occasional small scratches on the urethane cover. In all honesty, I didn’t feel the need to take the ball out of play over the 18 holes, but it was heading for the bag after that.

Durability concerns, of course, leave golfers with a decision to make, because from a performance standpoint the Cut DC was exceptional on every level. And its retail price is well below the most popular high-end golf balls. If you’re a golfer looking for a Tour-caliber golf ball at an affordable price, I think you should expect to make some sort of sacrifice. That being the case, the Cut DC is certainly worth a try, as its performance belies its price.

Michael C. Ford