Warm temperatures and low humidity cause golf courses to water the greens

It’s only the second week of February and some golf courses are already watering the greens. said the extreme temperature swings and lack of humidity aren’t what he’s used to dealing with. you wouldn’t want that to happen,” Giebelhaus said. Crews place a large water tank on a trailer and manually water each green. Just a lot of work. Something we don’t like to do but when you have to do it you have to do it,” Giebelhaus said. Lincoln has had 3.7 inches of snow this winter. That’s a minimum of 61. However, Prof. of Meteorology and Climatology from the University of Nebraska, Mark Anderson, said that doesn’t mean we’re down in humidity. “We’re not as bad as people think. Now the flip side is that the temperatures are so hot, that the plants in the ground are actually losing moisture that they wouldn’t lose otherwise,” Anderson said. Anderson said it’s too early to determine if we are headed for drought. “It’s really dry to the west of us and really wet to the east of us. And we’re going to have the storm systems and we may or may not have precipitation,” Anderson said. In the meantime, Giebelhaus has a simple tip for homeowners to check if they need to take action too. “Scrub the top of grass. If you don’t see any green in there, then I might put some water on it. Just change color. Don’t make mud. Just change the color and get it wet.” Giebelhaus said. Anderson said he watered some of his evergreen bushes this weekend, but he’s not too excited yet,” Anderson said. Experts said don’t use your sprinkler system and be sure to disconnect your hose from the facet. Temperatures still drop below zero, your pipes could burst.

It’s only the second week of February and some golf courses are already watering the greens.

“Basically we’re just trying to rehydrate the crown of the plant which is the highest growing point,” said Lincoln Highland Golf Course Superintendent Chad Giebelhaus.

He said the extreme temperature swings and lack of humidity aren’t what he’s used to.

“Trying to keep it from drying out or dying, you know, from the cold, dry freeze-thaw. All the stuff you wouldn’t want to happen,” Giebelhaus said.

Teams place a large water tank on a trailer and manually water each green.

“Just a lot of work. Something we don’t like to do but when you have to do it, you have to do it,” Giebelhaus said.

Lincoln had 3.7 inches of snow this winter. This is a 61-year low.

However, University of Nebraska meteorology and climatology professor Mark Anderson said that doesn’t mean we’re down in humidity.

“We’re only half an inch behind for the year since January 1,” Anderson said.

“We’re not as bad as people think. Now the flip side is that the temperatures are so hot, the plants in the ground are actually losing moisture that they wouldn’t lose otherwise,” Anderson said.

Anderson said it’s too early to tell if we’re headed for drought.

“It’s very dry to the west of us and very wet to the east. And we’re going to have storm systems and we may or may not have precipitation,” Anderson said.

In the meantime, Giebelhaus has a simple tip for homeowners to check if they need to take action as well.

“Scrub the top of the grass. If you don’t see any green in there, then I might put some water on it. Just change color. Don’t make mud. Just change color and wet it. the.” said Giebelhaus.

Anderson said he watered some of his evergreen bushes over the weekend, but wasn’t too excited yet.

“You know, we go back to last year, it was -31 degrees and it looks pretty nice. Be careful what you wish for,” Anderson said.

Experts said don’t use your sprinkler system and be sure to disconnect your hose from the side. Temperatures still drop below zero, your pipes could burst.

Michael C. Ford